Leave mind unfabricated, just where it is!

Padampa Sangye said:

Don’t take appearance inside!
Don’t project inner conceptions outside!
Don’t enslave body to mind!
Don’t occupy mind with body!
Don’t attend to view or meditation!
Leave mind unfabricated, just where it is!
~from Lion of Siddhas: The Life and Teachings of Padampa Sangye, trans. David Molk

    Lately I’ve been reading Padampa Sangye, the great Indian siddha of the 11-12th century, who visited Tibet, Bhutan and China. Some say in China he was known as Bodhidharma, the legendary founder of Zen. (!) Some say he was also known as the famous sage Kamalashila in India. Some say he lived hundreds of years. In any event, it seems certain that he taught in a style that was unique and unclassifiable (in Tibet, the people were unsure at first whether he was a Hindu or Buddhist siddha), yet powerful and direct. I hope to share some more of his teachings here in the future.

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4 thoughts on “Leave mind unfabricated, just where it is!

  1. I love this — instruction can’t get much more essential than that! Easy to remember too! Thanks for sharing this with us, Hal — I look forward to hearing more of the teachings of Padampa Sangye.

  2. This instruction is just like: “Don’t think of a pink elephant”. Now, one is practicing ‘leaving the mind unfabricated’ or ‘leaving everything as it is’ or ‘doing nothing’ or ‘not focusing on anything’ or ‘to be naturally’.. . That’s meditation and an artificial/fabricated focus to. It is not as easy as it sounds. There are two completely different ways, to implement these tasks. Neither focus, nor meditate. De facto.

  3. Yes, exactly, thigles! By making these impossible imperatives, Padampa Sangye is fiercely embodying the Madhaymikan catuskoti, the 4 negations, here, consistent with his realization of and emphasis on Prajnaparamita! As long as one is caught within the 4 extremes, one is powerless to obey his command. And if one is not caught on the horns of the tetralemma, the command is unnecessary. But give Padampa a break–the poor fellow has to say something, doesn’t he? 🙂

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